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Monday, August 10, 2015

The Distance Between Lost and Found






by Kathryn Holmes


This past Friday, August 7, 2015, Marcy and I posted our answers to Kathryn’s debut novel The Distance Between Lost and Found. Today, you get to read Kathryn’s favorites.

Awesome answers, Kathryn! We can’t wait for our readers to read the novel. And hopefully to give us a few of their favorites, too.


1) What is your favorite line or paragraph from the novel as it relates to the main character’s development and/or growth?

Page 190-191:

The rain starts: sharp, hard drops that sting Hallelujah’s arms. It feels like an attack. Like they let their guard down, and now nature is back with a vengeance.

But Hallelujah breathes in deep. Limps along. Tries to think of her skin as armor. She’s not the same person she was two days ago. That girl ran from rain, fell down mountainsides, scrambled in the mud, blind and gasping and scared.

This girl, this new Hallelujah, is still scared, but she watches her footing, and she holds on to Jonah and Rachel instead of pushing them away. She watches the rocks grow closer. For once, she knows where she’s going.


2) What is your favorite chapter ending or cliffhanger?

Hard to do without spoilers! I love this final image from page 105:

Jonah pokes at the fire with a stick. His shoulders are hunched. He looks young. He looks vulnerable. He says it again: “I’m sorry.”

“Me too,” Hallelujah repeats. She hesitates for a second, then puts her arm around him, just across his back. It feels both totally wrong and completely right—to be sitting here, now, under an open sky, raw and injured and exposed, to be comforting Jonah, to be apologized to. She doesn’t know if it feels wrong or right to him, because they don’t talk after that. Jonah adds a few more branches to the fire. After a while they lie down, closer this time, careful not to disturb Rachel, whose sleep exhales puff white and frosty in the mountain air.


3) Who is your favorite secondary character and why?

Since DISTANCE spends so much time with only three characters, it’s hard to choose between Jonah and Rachel! Jonah has my heart. He means well—but he screwed up, big time, and he’s trying desperately to make up for what he did. Rachel makes me laugh. She knows just what to say to lighten the mood. She’s a caring friend. Hallie needs them both on her journey, and as their author, I love them equally. J


4) What is your favorite line or paragraph of description?

Here’s one of my favorite descriptive passages, from Page 89:

The view is incredible. A 360 panorama. If this were a movie, the camera would sweep around and around, taking in their wide eyes along with the mountains rolling into the distance. There would be a swell of strings, a breathless final swoop before the dialogue, soft and awestruck.

It’s not the tallest peak. Not by a long shot. They’re at the top of what can’t even really be called a mountain, not with everything else around. There are mountains visible behind other mountains, rising up behind valleys, peeking out, hills upon hills upon hills. The green mounds look so much softer and gentler from a distance. Almost like a blanket that someone left rumpled. Or that someone’s still sleeping under.

And there are so many trees. So many shades of green. Sunlit green and shadowed green. Grass green and moss green and pine green and the greens of every variety of leaf.


5) What is your favorite line of dialogue?

I’ll pick a lighter moment, from Page 118:

“We have to maintain order, so we don’t go all Lord of the Flies.”


Congratulations to Kathryn on her debut novel, The Distance Between Lost and Found!


MY BIO:

Kathryn Holmes grew up in Maryville, Tennessee, where she was an avid reader and an aspiring writer from an early age. She now lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her husband and piles upon piles of books. A graduate of The New School’s MFA in Creative Writing program, Kathryn works as a freelance dance journalist, among other writing gigs. The Distance Between Lost and Found is her debut novel.


LINKS:


Friday, August 7, 2015

First Friday - Five Favorite Things - Debut Novel Day

by Dave Amaditz &
Marcy Collier



Welcome to August’s version of - First Friday - Five Favorite Things - Debut Novel Day. In this monthly series, we ask five simple questions about a debut novel that will hopefully entice anyone reading this post to pick up the novel and read it themselves, and/or give them at a glance some insight into the author's writing style and voice as well as how some of the characters might think or act. We do this by presenting, first, answers to our Five Favorite Things, followed by the author's answers in a follow-up post.

This month we're pleased to highlight debut novelists, Kathryn Holmes and her novel, The Distance Between Lost and Found. When Hallelujah gets lost in the woods while on a camping trip with her church group, she realizes that “being found” relates to so many more things than a simple physical rescue.


1) What is your favorite line or paragraph from the novel as it relates to the main character's development and/or growth?

Dave – Although there are so many particular passages to choose from, I chose this because I think it is when Hallelujah begins to realize that the situation she was in prior to getting lost was manageable, especially in comparison to being lost in the Smoky Mountains.

She used to think alone was the answer. Alone would stop the whispers and the taunts. Alone couldn’t get her into any more trouble. Alone meant not getting hurt. Now, she’d give anything to see another human being. To hear someone call her name. She settles for listening to her own voice. “Hello,”

Marcy – In this point in the story, Hallelujah begins to take responsibility for her actions and wants to stand up for herself and her friends.

Hallelujah thinks before she can help it. And just like that, she decides not to be useless anymore. It isn’t only up to Jonah to get them out. Or up to the rescuers to find them. She can do more than just keep from falling behind.


2) What is your favorite chapter ending or cliffhanger?

Dave - This particular chapter ending comes from early in the novel.

Jonah shows them how to rate their bags so there tucked up in the nearest tree. Then they gather back around the fire. It’s only 830, but in the dark, in the cold, it feels later. With the woods looming on all sides, it’s like the fire is the only thing keeping the trees and the darkness from swallowing them whole.

Marcy - This particular passage struck me when Hallelujah and Rachael are having a heart to heart conversation.

“And I don’t want to be that girl anymore. I don’t”

Rachel squeezes Hallelujah’s arm. “So don’t be,” she says.

With those three words, Hallelujah feels something lifted, a heavy coat shrugged off. So don’t be. Like that’s all there is to it.

But is it that easy? Can she just decide not to be that person anymore—the one she hates? Can she really move on?


3) Who is your favorite secondary character and why?

Dave – Jonah is my favorite secondary character because of his strong, steady resolve and his inner sense of self security. The following line gives an example.

“I know too many people who are one thing when they think it matters and another thing the rest of the time. And I don’t want to be like that. So I don’t curse at all. It’s like-what you see is what you get.”

Marcy –  Rachael is my favorite secondary character because of her straightforward, no-bull attitude. Like in this paragraph when she’s talking about Jonah.

“Because he’s upset, and we have to be a team.” Rachel is matter-of-fact. “And because he’s the one who knows how to make a fire and keep our food away from bears.”


4) What is your favorite line or paragraph of description?

Dave -  Picking my favorite line of description was extremely difficult as there were so many great images to choose from, but I settled on this particular passage because as well as paining a beautiful image it gives us insight into Hallelujah’s personality.

The scenery is enough to distract her. Sunrise over the mountains, all pinks and purples and peaches with white cotton-ball clouds. The clouds are low, so low Hallelujah feels like she could reach up and grab one. Light streams down, split into actual shining rays. The see of trees is a vivid, happy green in the early morning light, a stark contrast to last night’s dark, threatening void. The hills still stretch out in all directions, but now they look bright and new. And for just a moment, Hallelujah feels hope burble up in her chest, fresh and sharp and cold as a mountain spring. Anything could happen today. Great things could happen today. Rescue-improbable as it seemed the last night-could happen today. And she is hit by such a strong sense of everything is going to be okay that she gasps.


Marcy -  This paragraph took me right to the campsite. The imagery and sensory details made me salivating to eat the fish too.

They dig in. Fingers scooping up fish, tongues licking lips. The fish has no seasoning except the smoke from the fire, but it’s warm and it’s solid and it’s delicious. Hallelujah barely stops to breathe before her pile is gone. She gasps. She licks each finger, slowly, savoring. She closes her eyes. Inhales the smell of burnt fish. Relishes the feeling of food in her belly.

Rachel burps. Loudly. It startles Hallelujah’s eyes open. “Nice,” she says.


5) What is your favorite line of dialogue?

Dave - I chose this line because I believe it says so much in so few words.

“All you control is you,” Jonah murmurs.

Marcy – Jonah is explaining to Hallelujah why he doesn’t swear.

“I wouldn’t like it if people yelled ‘Jonah!’ every time they stubbed their toe. But it’s more that—" He turns to look at Hallelujah and Rachel. Walks over. “I know too many people who are one thing when they think it matters and another thing the rest of the time. And I don’t want to be like that. So I don’t curse at all. It’s like—what you see is what you get.”




Friday, July 3, 2015

First Friday - Five Favorite Things - Debut Novel Day

Mosquitoland_FINAL.jpg


Welcome to July’s version of - First Friday - Five Favorite Things - Debut Novel Day. In this monthly series, we ask five simple questions about a debut novel that will hopefully entice anyone reading this post to pick up the novel and read it themselves, and/or give them at a glance some insight into the author's writing style and voice as well as how some of the characters might think or act. We do this by presenting, first, answers to our Five Favorite Things, followed by the author's answers in a follow-up post.

This month we're pleased to highlight debut YA novelist, David Arnold and his novel, Mosquitoland. After being uprooted from her home and mom in Cleveland, Ohio, Mary Iris Malone (Mim) is not okay. She hates living in Jackson, Mississippi with her father and stepmother. And now that all communication has been cut off with her mom, Mim is on the run to save her mom.


1) What is your favorite line or paragraph from the novel as it relates to the main character's development and/or growth?

DaveHome is hard. Harder than reasons. It’s more than a storage unit for your life and its collections. It’s more than an address, or even the house you grew up in. People say home is where the heart is, but I think maybe home is the heart. Not a place or a time, but an organ, pumping life into my life.

Marcy –  Mim remembers when her mom would give a homeless man money. She’d purposely go the long way to soccer practice so she could give the man three dollars. One day Mim’s dad was with them. He started complaining about how the lazy bum could get a job, when Mim’s mom rolled down the window and handed Reggie three dollars.

Later, just before bed, I asked her if Dad was mad that she gave three bucks to Reggie. She said no, but I knew better. I asked if Dad was right, if Reggie was nothing but a lazy drunk. Mom said some homeless folk were like that, but she didn’t think Reggie was one of them. She said if he were, she would give him three bucks. She said it wasn’t her job to pick which ones were genuinely starving and which ones were faking it.

“Help is help to anyone, Mary. Even if they don’t know they’re asking for it.”

I said that made a whole lot of sense, because it did.

And it still does.

Here’s the thing, Iz: my mom needs help right now. And I know it, even if she doesn’t.


2) What is your favorite chapter ending or cliffhanger?

Dave - I jog up to cement stairs, unable to hold back a smile of my young adult life. This detour has already paid for itself.

MarcyThis paragraph speaks for itself.

I am tired of being alone.

“You need help?” Walt’s quiet voice brings me back to the now, the real, the detour.

I, Mary Iris Malone, smile at the bright new moon. Wiping away my tears, I wonder if things are finally changing, “Yeah, Walt, I might.”


3) Who is your favorite secondary character and why?

Dave – I chose Mom as my favorite secondary character. She has so many lines that made her seem to me, so carefree, so down-to-Earth. Mim, the main character, is worried her mother is going to be mad after she got into a fight in school defending a friend.

“There are worse fates than being slow-witted,” she says. “You broke that other kids nose, right? The one who made fun of Ricky?” I say, “yes ma’am, I did.” “Good,” she says, taking another bite.


Marcy –  This novel has an amazing lineup of characters. I would choose Walt for his innocence and love of life. He has down’s syndrome and has been abandoned by his father but has an amazing outlook on life.

“Ready to swim?”

Walt looks up at me with wide-eyed enthusiasm. He’s shirtless now, holding a flashlight and sporting a pair of cutoff daisy dukes. The Cubs hat and the green Chucks he’s still wearing as well as that infectious smile that sets my heart aflame. It’s the same smile my dad and I used when we made waffles, only Walt’s is magnified somehow, like I-don’t-know-what…the Belgian waffle version or something.

“Here,” he says, offering a wad of denim. “My backup pair.”

Hopping down from the boulder, I take the shorts and hold them out in front of me. They’re a little wide in the waist, and far shorter than any shorts I’ve ever worn.

Walt throws his finger in the air, spins on his heels, “This way to my pool!”


4) What is your favorite line or paragraph of description?

Dave – As often happens, Marcy and I choose similar favorite lines. She has chosen one below that I had picked, so I will choose another. I think it’s pretty self-explanatory why I chose this, as it paints a pretty vivid picture.

ED’S PLACE: CHICKEN-N-GAS The image in my brain is unsettling to say the least: Ed, a disgruntled Vietnam vet, stands over a stove with two ashy cigarillos hanging from either side of his mouth; he’s stirring a giant pot of his famous chicken-petroleum soup.

Marcy –  Mim gets wiser as she gets closer to seeing her mom.

I swear, the older I get, the more I value bad examples over good ones. It’s a good thing, too, because most people are egotistical, neurotic, self-absorbed peons, insistent on wearing near-sighted glasses in a far-sighted world. And it’s the exact sort of myopic ignorance that has led to my groundbreaking new theory. I call it Mim’s Theorem of Monkey See Monkey Don’t, and what it boils down to is this: it is my belief that there are some people whose sole purpose of existence is to show the rest of us how not to act.


5) What is your favorite line of dialogue?

Dave – This line of dialogue from Walt, a homeless, mentally disabled young man, made me laugh when I read it. It easily cinched my favorite when I read the end of the novel.

“Yes,” says Walt, going back to his butterfly. “I’ll remember the rendezvouski.”

Marcy –  Words of wisdom from Mim’s mom:

My mother was the greatest alarm clock of all time. Every morning, without fail, she threw back the curtains to let the sun in, and always, she said the same thing.

“Have a vision, Mary, unclouded by fear.”



Congratulations to David for the praise he’s received on this wonderful novel!

 Kids' Indie Next List "Top Ten" Pick (Spring 2015)
 ABA Indies Introduce Debut Authors and New Voices title
 A Junior Library Guild selection
 Publishers Weekly Spring 2015 Flying Start


To read more about David Arnold and his debut novel, Mosquitoland, please go to:



Monday, June 8, 2015

Surviving Bear Island

by Paul Greci




This past Friday, June 5, 2015, Marcy and I posted our answers to Paul’s debut novel Surviving Bear Island. Today, you get to read Paul’s favorite's.

Great answers, Paul! We can’t wait for our readers to read the novel. And hopefully to give us a few of their favorites, too.

1) What is your favorite line or paragraph from the novel as it relates to the main character's development and/or growth?

Part of me wanted to go back and just stay. It would be easier that what I was doing now. But I knew that choosing the easy path meant choosing death. And I wanted to live. P. 90.


2) What is your favorite chapter ending or cliffhanger?

Chapter One: I scanned the water. No sign of the sea lions. And the waves seemed to be calming down. Little did I know I would be upside down in the water in less than an hour—fighting for my life.


3} Who is your favorite secondary character and why?

Surviving Bear Island has one primary character. I’d say my favorite secondary character is Tom’s father because even though he isn’t present for most of the story, Tom’s relationship to him continues to develop.


4) What is your favorite line or paragraph of description?

Sometime toward morning the heavy rain and wind died, replaced by a fine mist, like the ground had taken as much moisture as it could and was spewing it back as fog. P. 163


5) What is your favorite line of dialogue?

Tom’s father: “When you’re alone in the wilderness, everything is magnified.” P. 43



BIO
Living in Alaska for 25 years, Paul has seen bears fishing for salmon, a pair of bald eagles building a nest, polar bears gnawing on a whale carcass, 10,000 walruses hauled out together on the Bering Sea coast, and 120,000 caribou gathered on the Arctic Coastal Plain. And when he’s not teaching school or exploring the Alaskan wilderness, Paul Greci is thinking up ways to keep hungry moose out of his garden. His debut novel, Surviving Bear Island is a 2015 Junior Library Guild Selection.



Brief HISTORY OF HOW SURVIVING BEAR ISLAND CAME TO BE PUBLISHED

Having completed the first draft of this novel 10 years ago, and then countless drafts since then, I feel incredibly fortunate to have found a home for this book. Six years into the revision process Surviving Bear Island morphed from a third-person young adult novel into a first-person middle grade novel. The main roadblock I ran into when writing Surviving Bear Island was how to write a story with primarily one character and have it have authentic emotional depth and complexity. Early drafts of my story were very plot heavy and episodic. As the years went by and I wrote other stories where characters were interacting with each other, I developed my skills for exploring emotional depth, and also for writing in first person. I think those other manuscripts I wrote gave me the tools I needed to transform a single-character third-person narrative into a single-character first-person narrative that was much more character-driven and emotionally authentic. As my agent was trying to sell a different manuscript, we started working on getting Surviving Bear Island ready for submission and then started subbing it simultaneously with the other manuscript, and it found its home at Move Books.


Congratulations to Paul on his debut novel, Surviving Bear Island and for the novel being chosen as a Junior Library Guild selection. Way to go, Paul!

To read more about Paul Greci’s debut novel, Surviving Bear Island, please go to:

Kirkus Review: “Bear Island is a challenging environment to survive but a terrific thrill on the page. (Adventure. 9-14)”   https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/paul-greci/surviving-bear-island/
Junior Library Guild Selection: Surviving Bear Island is a Junior Library Guild Selection in the High Interest Middle Category.

Friday, June 5, 2015

First Friday - Five Favorite Things - Debut Novel Day

by Dave Amaditz and
Marcy Collier


 

Welcome to June’s version of - First Friday - Five Favorite Things - Debut Novel Day. In this monthly series, we ask five simple questions about a debut novel that will hopefully entice anyone reading this post to pick up the novel and read it themselves, and/or give them at a glance some insight into the author's writing style and voice as well as how some of the characters might think or act. We do this by presenting, first, answers to our Five Favorite Things, followed by the author's answers in a follow-up post.

This month we're pleased to highlight debut novelist, Paul Greci and his novel, Surviving Bear Island. Tom is stranded on Bear Island in the Alaskan wilderness during a kayaking trip with his father. When his kayak is overturned, Tom finds himself alone, but quickly finds out that living a solitary life on a remote and deserted island is the least of his fears.

Marcy and I can’t wait for you to join this incredible journey on the island with us.


1) What is your favorite line or paragraph from the novel as it relates to the main character's development and/or growth?

Dave – Tom has been struggling for days to survive on the island. His time alone has given him plenty of time to think of the problems plaguing him, one of which was trying to come to grips with the fact he believes he was responsible for his mother’s death. I like how he learns to accept what he has or has not done. I believe this passage portrays those feelings well.

I knew I had to take care of myself. That no one was going to do anything for me. And when it comes right down to it, you have to rely on yourself. You’ve got to live with yourself and the choices you make.

MarcyThroughout the novel, Tom has a lot of time to reflect on his home life and his problems. This paragraph is poignant and reflects that early on in the novel, the main character has the instinct to survive in bad times both at home and on Bear Island.

After he found out Mom died, he stood in the kitchen and dropped plates, one by one, on the floor until he’d broken them all. Then he took the bowls and did the same thing. I remember telling him to stop, but he acted like I wasn’t even there. I went into my room and cried and cried, and he never came in. When I came out hours later, he was sitting on the couch, and in the kitchen there wasn’t a speck of glass on the floor. I sat down next to him, and he put his arm around me. “We’ll get through this,” he said. But then he didn’t say anything much for months and months.

“I’ll get through this,” I said. “I’ll keep searching for Dad until I find him.” Another shiver ripped through my body.


2) What is your favorite chapter ending or cliffhanger?

Dave - As Marcy mentions below, there were many fantastic cliffhangers, but I chose this one from earlier in the novel while Tom is trying to escape from a bear.

The bear twisted away from me and I jumped backwards. My feet scrambled for grip as my arms reached out for the steep slope. I grabbed a berry bush by the base and it gave way. I fell backwards, like I’d been dumped out of an airplane, and landed on my back with my legs flat, pointing down slope. A sea of green flew over me as I bumped down the slope and gained speed with no sign of stopping.

I let out a scream.

Then my heels hit something that sent a jolt through my hips and all the way to the base of my head. I flopped forward, and all of a sudden I was flying through the air. Everything slowed down, like an instant replay of someone doing a ski jump.

I knew I was moving, was airborne, but felt no pressure-no resistance. Then I slammed into the ground. Face first. Mouth first.

Marcy – There were many intense cliffhangers in the novel. This chapter ending was more about survival and perseverance.

Choices. Life was full of choices. Don’t look back, I told myself. It does no good. I swallowed the last of my jerky and started down the slope in search of a place to camp.


3) Who is your favorite secondary character and why?

Dave – It’s difficult for me to pick a secondary character, as Tom is alone for most of the novel. However, through flashbacks, I got to meet his dad. Tom has vivid recollections of the advice his dad has given, and to Tom’s great fortune, it always comes at a time when he needs it the most, as if his dad is right beside him. Following, is an example.

When you’re wet, the only way to stay warm without a fire or a change of clothes is to keep moving.

or…

The spark’s got to hit some very small, dry flammable material-like dried grass or wood shavings or tiny scraps of birchbark. And then, you’ve got to blow on it and feed it.

Marcy – My favorite character is Mom. Even though Tom’s mom is no longer with him, her spirit is still alive inside of him and the memory of her guides him through his survival on Bear Island. Her easygoing personality and love of life and music shines through in her son.

I know my mom could’ve come up with something better, but she’d be happy that I was making a song. A song with her in mind. “Let the music flow through you,” she’d say. “Play with it. You don’t make mistakes when you make music. You make discoveries.”

There had to be a salmon stream farther back in the bay. Had to be, or else I’d have to cut off some fingers and roast them. Maybe I could work that in.

So the whole thing would go like this:

Wormy blue berries will help.
But alone will only make me yelp.
Like a dog I need more than a treat.
Salmon for the Sentinels can’t be beat.
If I don’t find any, then fingers I’ll eat.


4) What is your favorite line or paragraph of description?

Dave – This section comes from later in the novel while Tom is trying to use his flint to spark a flame, something he has never done, but needs to do, because he has no other resources to start a fire. I can see what he is doing. I can feel it, feel exactly what he is going through. Can’t you?

Come on, I thought. Just this one time. All I need is one flame. I closed my eyes and just kept running the knife up and down the flint. In my mind I saw sparks, or maybe I was seeing images of the real things through my eyelids. Part of me didn’t believe the flint would work, and part of me felt like I was a failure because I had this fire-starting tool and couldn’t get it to work. And all the time I just kept running the knife on the flint, keeping my eyes closed. I could feel the wood shavings brushing my knuckles as my hand moved.

“Fire, fire, fire,” I started singing.

Marcy – This paragraph shows a great deal about how Tom not only blames himself for his mom’s death, but also how he believes his dad blames him as well.

And for that whole first year I thought if Mom was gone I may as well be gone, too. Like I was part of a package deal and now the deal was off. And I thought Dad blamed me for Mom’s death too. I mean, he never told me he did, but he never told me he didn’t. Never. And he was right there when she asked me if I wanted to go on the ride and I chose to practice with my bow instead. The last thing she’d said was: If you’re not going, I’m gonna bike the whole loop.” And later that month my dad burned my bow and target.


5) What is your favorite line of dialogue?

Dave - For me, this line was easy. It’s short, as are most of the things his dad has said, but it tells you everything you need to know about what it will be like for Tom while alone on the island.

“When you are alone in the wilderness, everything is magnified.”

Marcy – Tom often talks to himself since he doesn’t have anyone else. These few lines are so very visual and true.

“Just me now,” I said. “Me and the wild. I’m wild. Part of the wild.”


To read more about Paul Greci’s debut novel, Surviving Bear Island, please go to:

Kirkus Review: “Bear Island is a challenging environment to survive but a terrific thrill on the page. (Adventure. 9-14)”   https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/paul-greci/surviving-bear-island/
Junior Library Guild Selection: Surviving Bear Island is a Junior Library Guild Selection in the High Interest Middle Category. https://www.juniorlibraryguild.com/books/view.dT/9780985481094



Friday, May 29, 2015

Keeping Teens and Tweens Safe Online

by Marcy Collier

Ipads and Iphones and tablets oh my!

If you're the parent of a teen, tween and even younger, they have probably
used an electronic device of some kind. Heck, in my son's middle school,
all of the students are issued Chromebooks in the beginning of the school year.
All of their books and most homework is done online. They collaborate with
teachers and other students via email and Google Docs.

My boys are computer savvy, but as a parent I worry. You can't watch them
24/7 and monitor every single document, video and text. I pay attention.
I've had the talk about online predators at least a zillion times. I've even
had my best friend who worked for the Federal Bureau of Investigations in
the division of online Crimes Against Children have several talks with
my older son on her experiences and advice on how to be careful online.

New apps are popping up every day. My advice is to be aware, ask questions
and do surprise checks on all devices. If your children know you'll be checking up
on them, they'll be less likely to post and comment inappropriately online. I always
tell them never to post anything they wouldn't want the world to see.

Here's a link to a great article on protecting your teen!

https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2014/11/14/protect-your-teens-7-apps-and-websites-parents-should-be-aware-of/